Saturday, August 20, 2016

"OH, HELL!" ('15) for marionette and mask




"OH, HELL!"



Faustus awakens, and stands. Mephostophiles is behind him.

FAUSTUS
Was ist los?! Wo bin ich?!

MEPHOSTOPHILES
The jaws of hell are open to receive thee.

FAUSTUS
(looking about)
Wer hat das gesagt?

MEPH.
It is I, Faustus, Mephostophiles, now thy master.

Faustus looks up, sees Meph.

FAUSTUS
Ach, du lieber Gott in Himmel!

MEPH.
Do not bring Him up here! This is Hell!

FAUSTUS
(looking around)
Was zur Holle?!

MEPH.
This is Hell. Where thou shalt spend eternity.

FAUSTUS
Warum Sie sprechen Englisch?

MEPH.
Because I am an Englishman.

FAUSTUS
Du nimmst mich auf den Arm!

MEPH.
I will only pull thy leg literally, Faustus.

FAUSTUS
Wie, bitte?

MEPH.
I will be tormenting thee, Faustus, for eternity. As is my right and
duty per our pact.

FAUSTUS
Ach ja, daB.

MEPH.
Yes, that.

Faustus tries to run away, but can't get beyond arms length,
and ends up going back and forth.

MEPH.
Thou cannot escape me, Faustus.

FAUSTUS
You dunt zay.

MEPH.
You used English.

FAUSTUS
Ja, I speek Englisch.

MEPH.
I did not know thou spoke English.

FAUSTUS
How doo you dink I know vhat yoo zay?

MEPH.
Oh, right.

FAUSTUS
Dummkopf!

Meph glowers at him a moment, then kicks him in the
stomach, knocking him down.

MEPH.
Watch what thou say, human!

FAUSTUS
(catching his breath)
Heilige ScheiBe!
(standing)
I did not know you vere zuch a delicate floh-er.

MEPH.
It is MY job to torment THEE for eternity, human.

FAUSTUS
(starts pacing back and forth)
All ouwr contrakt zaid vas you vould hafe me body and soul.

MEPH.
Yes, that is true.

FAUSTUS
Und, vere ist my body?

MEPH.
It was torn asunder by devils, then burnt upon a pier by humans.

FAUSTUS
Vich meenz I am a spirit, ja?

MEPH.
Yes, that is so.

FAUSTUS
(waving broadly at him)
Zo, I can do anyding you can do...
(breaking into semi-song)
...better. I can do anyding better dan you.

MEPH.
(rocking back and forth)
OH NO! NOT MUSICAL COMEDY!!!

FAUSTUS
(laughing maniacally)
JA! DIS IST ONLY DE BEGINNING!

Meph. tries to escape offstage, but still connected to
Faustus, who follows, singing.



Sunday, May 9, 2010

UNDEAD, Dreams of Darkness, Act II

ACT II


Scene 14: (On one side of stage: Ward’s office. Neat and tidy. Nothing too personal, just
efficient. On the other side: Laura's room).

(Ward paces pensively. She is alone. Laura lies still. Enter Hesselius).

HESSELIUS
I came as soon as I got your message. What’s happened?

WARD
(Looking at him)
Renfield has escaped.

HESSELIUS
(Shocked)
Really?!
(Beat)
Do you know how he escaped?

WARD
(Frustrated)
No, we don’t. It’s as if he just got up and walked out, and no one saw him.
(Beat)
Of course the police seem to figure that someone on the staff just plain screwed up. Or even helped him.

HESSELIUS
What about the surveillance cameras?

WARD
(Throws up her hands)
He got round them. I can’t figure out how, but none of the tapes show him moving about, let alone leaving.

HESSELIUS
(Considering)
Yes, I see. Very interesting.

WARD
(Turning away)
And that’s not all, either.

HESSELIUS
(Looking up)
What else has happened?

WARD
I just got an e-mail from a doctor in the Czech Republic, who had seen him when he was hospitalized there, to inform me of her imminent arrival. We’re going to look like idiots!

HESSELIUS
(Trying to be comforting)
No you won’t. I am sure she will understand. My friend is an unusual case.

WARD
That he is.

HESSELIUS
When does the Czech doctor arrive?

WARD
Tonight.

HESSELIUS
Kind of sudden, isn’t it?

WARD
Yes, I would say so.

HESSELIUS
Had you heard from her before?

WARD
No. She says she wasn’t intricately involved with his stay there, but his case is apparently similar to others she has worked on.

HESSELIUS
She is a psychiatrist, then?

WARD
Yes.

HESSELIUS
(Musing)
Hmmm. Her visit may prove to be fortuitous.

WARD
How so?

HESSELIUS
Well, if she says she has known similar cases. She may know of some facts peculiar to her country, which might shed some light on it.
(Beat)
By the way, what about Ms. Sheridan? Is there any change?

WARD
She remains comatose. Nothing’s changed since the outburst you witnessed the other night.

HESSELIUS
I would like to see that video again, if I may.

WARD
Of course. But have you seen the latest newscasts?

HESSELIUS
No. Why.

WARD
There’s a new development.
(Takes a moment)
There was a murder, a very brutal murder, at an ATM.

HESSELIUS
Like the one in Czechoslavakia?

WARD
Yes.

HESSELIUS
Were there witnesses? Or video?

WARD
The ATM’S video monitor caught it all.

HESSELIUS
Did it look like Richard?

WARD
(Turns away)
I’m not sure. His face was covered.

HESSELIUS
Really?

WARD
(Turning back to him)
Yes. But it looked like hair.

HESSELIUS
Hair?
(Ponders)
His hair couldn’t have grown out that fast.

WARD
It’s very strange. And yet...

HESSELIUS
(Looking at her)
Yes?

WARD
I had the strongest feeling it was him.

HESSELIUS
(Frowning deeply)
This is bad, very bad.

WARD
Do you think that was Renfield in the ATM?

HESSELIUS
(Looks at her a moment before speaking)
Yes.
(Beat)
I’m certain that it was him.

WARD
(Trying to remain steady)
What do we do now?

HESSELIUS
I don’t know.
(Turns away)
I really don’t know.

(He slowly exits, pensive. Ward follows. Lights shift to evening. Bathory
enters Laura’s room. She smiles seeming benevolence down on her. She passes
her hand over her. Laura rises slowly, trance—like).

BATHORY
I have come to visit you, my child.
(Beat)
Do not be afraid.

LAURA
(Faraway)
You’re her, aren’t you?

BATHORY
(Smiles with a chuckle)
Yes.

LAURA
What have you done with my Richard?

BATHORY
He is no longer yours. He belongs to me now. As will you.

(Laura seems to stuggle against her. Bathory sits beside her).

BATHORY
(Caressing Laura’s hair)
My sweet child. Don’t you remember me from your dreams? How I loved you?

(Laura gasps. Bathory laughs).

LAURA
Was it real? Was it not just a dream?

BATHORY
No, my child.

(Bathory brushes Laura’s hair away from her throat, then leans into it. Laura
gives a small cry. Ward enters, crosses listlessly to her desk. She leans on
it for a moment, deep in thought. Bathory rises and lays Laura back down,
then exits. There is a knock at the door, which startles Ward. She looks up).

WARD
(Forcing her voice to be steady)
Yes? Come in.

(The door opens, enter Bathory — in her guise as Dr. Elisabeth Nadasdy).

WARD
Can I help you?

BATHORY
I am Dr. Nadasdy. You are Dr. Ward?

WARD
(Crossing to her)
Yes, I’m Dr. Ward.
(Stretches out her hand to shake)
Pleased to meet you, doctor.

(They shake hands).

WARD
(Indicating chair in front of desk)
Please have a seat.

(Bathory sits. Ward crosses around her desk, and sits behind it, leaning
forward with her elbows on the desk).

WARD
(A little nervous)
I was surprised to hear from you. Your name wasn’t on any of the reports I’d received along with Mr. Renfield.

BATHORY
As I stated in my electronic-mail, I was not intricately associated with his treatment in Prague. I merely observed.

WARD
(Trying not to offend)
Oh, I understand that. It’s just, well, it was kind of sudden, and, I’m afraid, there has been a recent complication with the patient.

BATHORY
(Raising an eyebrow)
Oh? May I presume to ask what that is?

WARD
(Sheepishly)
I’m afraid I can’t go into it at the moment.
(Searching)
I’m not trying to be evasive, but...

BATHORY
I do appreciate your position. And, as a guest here, I do not wish to impose. I would like to be of assistance, if I may. As I also stated in my electronic—mail, I have worked with some similar cases, and merely wish to compare notes.

WARD
(Relieved)
Yes, of course. I can fill you in on the details of his stay here, since he arrived.
(Beat)
Hopefully, I will be able to fill you in on the rest. Maybe even as soon as tomorrow.
(Beat)
Do you know how long you plan to stay?

BATHORY
I am on a study tour, so I will be not too far for some time.

WARD
Oh, very good.

(Pause. Ward looks uncomfortable, as Bathory watches her. Bathory rises).

BATHORY
Perhaps I should leave for now?

WARD
Oh, yes, of course.
(Leads her to the door)
Get yourself settled, and maybe we can talk tomorrow. Okay?

BATHORY
(A wry smile)
Certainly. Good night.

(She exits. Ward puts her hand to her forehead for a silent moment. Bathory
re-enters Laura’s room and kneels beside her. After a beat Bathory exits.
Ward crosses to door and exits. Lights shift to day. Ward enters and crosses
to her desk, where she looks through some papers, distractedly. There is a
knock at the door).

WARD
(Standing)
Come in.

(Enter police detectives Murnau and Galeen).

MURNAU
Dr. Ward?

WARD
Yes?

(Murnau and Galeen flash their badges).

MURNAU
I’m Detective Murnau, and this is my partner, Detective Galeen.

WARD
(Stepping from around the desk, dreading what’s to come)
How can I help you?

MURNAU
You know why we’re here, doctor?

WARD
(Regaining composure)
Something to do with my escaped patient, I’d guess.

GALEEN
You’ve heard about the murders the press is calling “The Cannibal Killings”?

WARD
(Guarded)
Yes.

MURNAU
We have reason to believe your patient is the perpetrator.

GALEEN
Have you had any thoughts on where he might go? Or hideout?

WARD
(Crossing back to her desk)
No. There’s nothing in his profile to suggest his movements.
(Turning back to them)
At least not to me.

MURNAU
You don’t seemed too surprised by the allegation.

WARD
(Sitting)
I’ve been wracking my mind over the possibility.

GALEEN
Did you see the ATM footage?

WARD
Yes.

GALEEN
Did it look like your patient...
(Looks at notebook)
...Richard Renfield?

WARD
(Sighing)
I couldn’t tell. If it was, something was very different about his face.

MURNAU
It seemed to be covered with hair. The photos you gave us had him clean—cut.

WARD
We kept him shaved, and his hair cut.

MURNAU
(Thinking)
Hmmm. He couldn’t have grown that much hair that fast.
(Starting for the door)
If you think of anything else, please all us.

WARD
I will.

(They exit, closing the door behind them. Ward sighs loudly and lays her head
on the desk. Laura jumps from her bed, crouching down).

LAURA
Richard?
(Looking around)
Richard? Are you there?

(Special upstage into which Renfield pounces, looking wolfish, with viscera
dripping from his mouth. B.O. In the darkness the sounds of sirens and
gunshots. Lights up on Ward facing out window. Laura back in bed. A knock at
the door. She wearily turns to the door).

WARD
Enter.

(Enter FBI agent Dreyer).

DREYER
(Flashing i.d.)
FBI. Agent Dreyer. I’d like to ask a few questions.

WARD
(Stands)
Of course. Come in.

(He crosses to her, she indicates chair, he sits).
[NOTE: in the final draft, now lost, the detectives were excised, and
the FBI agent, now named FONTAINE, was changed to a woman]

WARD
This, I suppose, has to do with the murders, and my escaped patient?

DREYER
Yes, precisely.

WARD
How come the FBI is involved?

DREYER
I’m a profiler. I’m working with local police to help them capture your patient.

WARD
Will they capture him? Or just kill him on sight?

DREYER
If I can successfully get inside his head, we might be able capture him alive.

WARD
I got the impression the police were more interested in killing him, than capture.

DREYER
(Slight smile)
I think the priority for all of us is to stop him before he kills again.

WARD
Yes, of course. I don’t mean to sound unconcerned with the victims. I’m very concerned.
(Puts a hand to her head)
I feel partially responsible.

DREYER
His escape?

WARD
(Sighing)
Yes.

DREYER
I’ve talked with detectives Murnau and Galeen, and seen the observation tapes you gave the police, and am very puzzled by his escape. Strange how the nurse on duty got suddenly ill, and the security guard had to help her, leaving the way clear for him.

WARD
This case gets stranger and stranger.

DREYER
I know you’ve been bombarded with questions, but I’d still like you to go over it with me, if you would.

WARD
I don’t know. Oh...

DREYER
Yes?

WARD
I don’t know if will help, but there was a woman who has just arrived...
(Waving vaguely at the chair)

DREYER
Yes.

WARD
She’s from the Czech Republic, and, although she wasn’t directly involved with Mr. Renfield’s case, she was there at the Czech hospital when he was.

DREYER
Really? What brought her here?

WARD
She’s on a study tour, and wanted to check up on him. Apparently, she’s seen some other cases similar to his.

DREYER
Do you know where I can reach her?

WARD
(Realisation)
Oh. No, I don’t know where she’s staying.
(Looking apologetic as cross behind desk)
I’m sorry, I was trying to avoid coming out and telling our patient escaped, and then, well, I just didn’t get to ask. But she should be getting in touch with me again, probably today.

DREYER
He came out of his stupor kinda suddenly, after all.

WARD
Yes. Very suddenly. I have to admit his is one of the strangest cases I’ve ever even heard of.

DREYER
Unusual?

WARD
Very. When he’s captured...
(Beat)
...assuming he is captured, and not killed, he’ll need to be put under heavy security, and fully observed.

DREYER
We just hope to stop him, before he kills again.

WARD
Yes, of course.
(Beat)
Actually, I think there is someone else who might be able to shed more light on it
than I.

DREYER
Oh?

WARD
Yes. He’s not been officially connected with the case, but, as a friend and colleague of Mr. Renfield, he has been supportive. He was a little reticent to open up to the police, as his and Renfield’s pursuits involve the Occult, but he told me he’d like to find someone to listen to his theory.

DREYER
So he has a theory?

WARD
Yes. He was reluctant to even share it with me, for fear I’d balk. At this stage I’m willing to keep a completely open mind.

DREYER
His theory is not...
(Beat)
...within the traditional acceptance?

WARD
Not in the modern world. Or, at least not in our scientific society.

DREYER
(Thoughtful)
Hmm. I would be interested in speaking to him.

WARD
And you'll keep an open mind?

DREYER
“There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophies, Horatio.”

WARD
I’ve begun to take that quote to heart.
(Beat)
I’ll call Dr. Hesselius.

(She picks up phone, as Dreyer makes a note).

DREYER
Hesselius? How do you spell that?

(Ward hangs up phone. Bathory enters Laura’s room, dressed like a doctor. She
kneels beside Laura’s bed).

BATHORY
(Caressing her hair)
Tonight, my child. Tonight, you leave this life, and join me in mine.
(Beat)
I may even give you your little Richard back.
(Chuckles, then becomes suddenly alert)
But I must leave you for now.

(She kisses Laura’s forehead, and exits. Lights shift to show passage of
time. Ward stands over Dreyer as he looks through [Renfield’s] file. A knock
at the door).

WARD
(Turning)
Come in.

(Hesselius enters. Ward crosses to him, as Dreyer rises and puts the folder
on the desk).

WARD
(Warmly)
I’m glad your here.

HESSELIUS
I told you I’d come whenever you called.

WARD
(Taking his hand)
I know. But this mess...

DREYER
(Crossing to them)
Dr. Hesselius, I’m Agent...
(Shows his credentials)
...Dreyer, of the FBI.
(Puts out his hand to Hesselius)
Dr. Ward told you about me.

HESSELIUS
(Shaking his hand)
Yes, of course.

DREYER
Let’s talk.

(They all cross back to the desk. Dreyer indicates for Hesselius to sit in
the chair he just vacated, and Hesselius sits).

WARD
(To Dreyer)
Why don’t you sit in my chair, Mr. Dreyer.

DREYER
(Smiling)
No thank you, doctor. I prefer to think on my feet.
(Indicates her chair)
Why don’t you have a seat.

(Ward sits in her chair. Dreyer stands a few feet away, up and between them).

DREYER
Now, Dr. Hesselius, why don’t you tell me what your theory is. Please be candid. I won’t scoff.

HESSELIUS
I am glad to hear it.
(Gathering his thoughts)
You see, I, like my friend Richard Renfield, am a student of the Occult. We believe in what is generally known as the Supernatural. How we put it is, simply, that many things thought of as Supernatural in the popular mind, are simply phenomenon at present unexplainable by science. Of course, the Scientific Community derides anything outside their realm of understanding, save for a few free—thinkers, who know better.
(Beat)
I believe that Richard came into contact with some, how shall I put it?...some kind of negative force which did not drive him out of his mind, but altered his conciousness.

DREYER
You mean like what used to be called demonic possession?

HESSELIUS
Very like. You see, just as various chemicals can alter our senses, so too can energy. Take for instance, sun-depravation, or electro-shock therapy.

DREYER
(Very focused)
Yes, I see.

HESSELIUS
I don’t pretend to know the nature of this force, which has altered my friend, but I do know that he is no longer himself. For, despite what the public may think of the
Occult, we’re not all into evil ways. Richard was a pacifist.

DREYER
(Picking up file off desk)
It says in this report that he was in the Czech Republic to study a centuries old serial murder case.

HESSELIUS
Yes. The Countess Erzsebet Bathory was what one today would call a serial murderer. She was responsible for the brutal deaths of some six hundred and fifty young women.

DREYER
(Whistles with amazement).
How did she get away with that?!

HESSELIUS
Her family was one of the most powerful in Hungary. For years she only killed peasant women hired as servants. It was only when she started using girls of the lower aristocracy that she was finally put on trial, albeit in absentia.

DREYER
What happened to her?

HESSELIUS
She and her accomplices were condemned. The accomplices were burnt at the stake, and she was walled up in a room in her castle, with only a very small food hatch and some
ventilation slits left open. She died about four years later.

DREYER
And Renfield was working on a book about her?

HESSELIUS
Yes. He was trying to connect with her spirit, her essence, or something that would lead him to a deeper understanding of her psyche, and what drove her to torture and kill.

DREYER
She also tortured her victims?

HESSELIUS
Yes. She had sessions, which were referred to as “games”, in which she and her accomplices, a small core of loyal servants, would use various means of torture.

DREYER
(Repulsed)
Nice lady.

HESSELIUS
She was known as the Blood Countess. Legend had it that she would bathe in the blood of virgins to maintain her youth,though no evidence of her actually doing so ever came to light. But, who knows. There was a great deal of politics going on. The Crown owed a great deal of money to the Bathory family.

(Bathory appears at the window, unseen by them).

DREYER
But you don’t think being at the scene of these crimes could have affected Renfield to the degree he would kill?

HESSELIUS
Actually, if I recall rightly, she didn’t commit many of her atrocities at the castle, as she preferred to be in one of her townhouses.

DREYER
Is it not possible that your friend became obsessed with his studies, to the point that he began to identify with her?

HESSELIUS
Well, I suppose that’s possible, it’s not really my field...
(Looks to Ward)
...I would not presume to deny such a possibility. Dr. Ward knows more about such things.

WARD
I leaned in that direction at the beginning, but he’s not using her methods. She tortured her victims, he, like a wild animal, is tearing his apart, even devouring parts.

DREYER
(Looking at her)
Yes, your quite right.
(Back to Hesselius)
I’m not discounting your explanation. But I do have to remain skeptical until we have more information to go on.

WARD
I heard they shot at him last night, when he...
(She can’t go on)

DREYER
Yes. The policeman who shot at him also claim to have hit him. Several times.

HESSELIUS
Yet it didn’t stop him.

DREYER
No. And that’s not all.

HESSELIUS
Oh?

DREYER
One of the reasons I’m open to your explanation is that in the ensuing chase, this wasn’t reported on the news to avoid panic, he came up against two officers, whom he ripped apart, despite their firing their guns.

WARD
Oh my god.

HESSELIUS
Somehow, we must stop him.

DREYER
Yes. And immediately.

WARD
We must have a plan.

(Both Hesselius and Dreyer nod agreement. Bathory laughs).

DREYER
(Looking off)
What’s that?

WARD
(Concerned)
Must be one of the patients.

(Hesselius listens acutely. In her room, Laura slowly rises off her bed,
smiling malevolently. F.O.).





END OF ACT II


NOTE: Planned and tried unsuccessfully to write a third act. It refused to be written. For the production, I wrote a monologue by Ward, now lost, who explains that Laura disappeared, and that Hesselius and Dreyer went in pursuit. Ward finishes by saying she has no closure, and feels at a loss.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

UNDEAD Dreams of Darkness, Act 1

UNDEAD
Dreams of Darkness


by
David M. Nevarrez

based on works by
Joseph Sheridan LeFanu and Braxn Stoker



























David M. Nevarrez
Magus Productions
210 West 70th Street
Suite 210
New York, NY 10023
c 1998 David M. Nevarrez/MagUS Productions
































UNDEAD


characters:

DR. HESSELIUS

RICHARD RENFIELD

DR. WARD

LAURA SHERIDAN

ERZSEBET BATHORY/DR. NADASDY

DETECTIVE MURNAU

DETECTIVE GALEEN

AGENT DREYER



Time: The Present

Place: Here and parts of Czech.



































UNDEAD 1/I





Scene 1. (Ward in a mental institution, with beds and
chairs and a TV monitor. The catatonic Richard Renield sits in chair Center).

(At rise Hesselius enters, circles about Renield, examining him closely).

HESSELIUS
Where are you, my friend? What happened to you out there that you end up here in this state?
(Stopping to one side of Renfield. Beat)
How do I get through to you?
(He sighs and crosses to the door, stops and looks back at Renfield).
HESSELIUS
I hope I can find out.

(He just stands watching Renfield. Beat. Hesselius freezes as lights down, spot
up, Renfield enters it).

RENFIELD
They say I’m mad.
Stark raving mad.
But I’m not mad.
I’m possessed.
(Looks disdainful)
These “priests of science”,
Burd’ning me with their labels,
Are nothing but fools,
Like of old.
(Laughs)
They say I’m mad,
Totally deranged,
Delusional, and schizo.
But I’m not.
(Confidently)
They don’t know what I know.
So they label me insane.
They think they have me.
But has me.
(Closes eyes. Lights upstage, Bathory enters behind him)
Erzsebet.
(Opens eyes)
She found me on my search.
She showd me the yay.
Erzsebet.

(Renfield turns to meet her. She raises her arms, wrapping them around
his neck, pulling him into her. Specials down, beat, lights up, Renfield in chair as before. Dr. Ward enters. She stops next to Hesselius [no longer “frozen”]).

WARD
So, Dr. Hesselius, any thoughts on your friend’s state?

HESSELIUS
(Looking at her)
You did say you’ve already started the standard procedures?

WARD
And still are. First...

HESSELIUS
You don’t have to run down the list, Dr. Ward. I’m only a layman in your field anyway, and I believe you’ve done all you can. It was more of a rhetorical question. As a
philosopher, I’m used to rhetorical questions.

WARD
(Smiles)
I see.

HESSELIUS
And I should take this opportunity to warn you I do a lot of thinking out loud.


WARD
Thanks for the warning.

HESSELIUS
(Looks back at Renfield)
I believe this is more what you could call a deep meditative state, in which he is processing what happened to him, than catatonia.

WARD
(Also looking at Renfield)
Yes, we have not been able to settle on a precise diagnosis. So far i seems different from the usual catatonic state...almost focused.

HESSELIUS
Yes, indeed.

WARD
Did Mr. Renfield study any meditative practices?

HESSELIUS
Yes, several. Although he had difficulty with impatience, he did have some success.

WARD
I see.
(Pulling a syringe from a pocket)
I’d like to try one of the drugs which have had results in bringing patients out of catatonia.
(Beat)
I’m a little uncertain about using it, so I have the minimal dosage of the mildest compound.

HESSELIUS
May I stay while you administer it?

WARD
I was hoping that you would.

(She rolls up Renfield’s sleeve, and gives him the shot. She then stands
back. She and Hesselius watch expectantly. Beat. Lights fade low, specials
up, as Renfield enters crying out. He crosses downstage, diagonally, to one
of the beds and sits. Area light up on bed. It is now Renfield’s room at a
hotel in Prague. Renfield sits writing. Enter Laura Sheridan).

RENFIELD
(Without looking up)
Yes, Laura?

LAURA
(Crossing to him, holding out a newspaper)
I’ve just come across an interesting item in one of the local English papers.

(Renfield stops writing, looks up, takes the paper).

LAURA
(Pointing it out)
This one here, about a bloodless corpse in Brataslava.

(Renfield reads, nodding and making little noises to himself).

RENFIELD
(After a moment)
Most interesting.
(Looks up at Laura)
Did any of the other papers report it?

LAURA
Nothing overtly. They may have buried it without the gruesome details.

(Renfield nods. Beat).

RENFIELD
Well, I was planning to go to Bratislava anyway, and this compels me to go now.

LAURA
And me?

RENFIELD
I want you to stay here and continue transcribing the archival material. I will visit the Slovak Academy of Sciences while I’m there snooping around, and if need be I’ll
set up an appointment for you, then you can come down.

LAURA
(Putting a hand on his shoulder)
Fine.

RENFIELD
(Standing uncomfortably)
Have you seen Mr. DelbrUck?

LAURA
Yes. He’s hovering around the front desk.

RENFIELD
I shall ask him to make travel arrangements for me. He seems to like being helpful.

LAURA
Would you like me to talk to him?

RENFIELD
(Taking a few steps away)
If you don’t mind.

LAURA
(Smiling)
Of course I don’t mind. If I can have a kiss first.

RENFIELD
(Stuttering)
I...Laura...about last night...

LAURA
(Teasing)
Yes?

RENFIELD
(Forcing it out)
I’m not...well, uhm, I just don’t know if we should really be involved, since we’re working together.

LAURA
(Mock-pouting)
Why?

RENFIELD
Well, our work is very...uh...dense. We need to concentrate fully upon it.

LAURA
(Amused)
Did you miss your books when I was in your bed?

RENFIELD
(Blushing, forced laugh)
No. Not really.

LAURA
(Moving close to him)
You mean a lot to me. I want to help you. I would never interfere with your work. If you need to go to Brataslava, and I have to stay here, I’m fine with that. I’ll miss you while I'm not with you, but I’ll be fine.

(He smiles at her, glowingly. She kisses him. He kisses her back. They kiss deeply. Beat. Then they pull back a little).

LAURA
So, when do you need to go?

RENFIELD
(Slight hesitation)
I need to go no later than tomorrow. You can go now.

LAURA
(Mock serious)
Yes, sir.

RENFIELD
(Reserved)
Thank you.

LAURA
(Brightly)
Certainly.

[3] (Laura exits. Lights shift. Renfield gets ready. Laura enters).

LAURA
(Mock military-style)
Good morning, sir.

RENFIELD
(Laughs)
Good morning, Laura. How are you, this morning?

LAURA
Just fine. And you?

RENFIELD
Feeling quite well.

(She crosses to him and kisses him).

LAURA
Are you ready?

RENFIELD
In a moment I’ll be on my way to the train.

LAURA
Following the trail of Countess Báthory.

RENFIELD
Exactly. As I may have mentioned I believe there are some important documents in the Slovak Academy of Sciences there.

LAURA
Yes, you did.
(Smiling)
A few times.

RENFIELD
Oh? Oh. The absent-minded professor.

(She laughs. He chuckles).

LAURA
And the murder?

RENFIELD
Yes, well, there’s a ghoulish little murder.

LAURA
(Smiling knowingly)
I see.

RENFIELD
Well, I must be off, or I’ll miss my train.

LAURA
(Putting her arm in his)
I hope the trip is pleasant.

RENFIELD
Thank you. Adieu.

(He kisses her).

LAURA
Adieu.

(Renfield exits. Laura watches him. Lights down. During the black—out the
sounds of a train WHISTLE, followed by moving train ENGINES, [possibly FILM
of train). Lights up on Renfield’s Hotel room in Bratislava - opposite side
of the stage from the other. Renfield on bed talking into a camcorder).

RENFIELD
Safely ensconced in Bratislava. The only information I could get on the murder was heresay. Hard to determine how much is true. I’ve decided to forget about that for now and concentrate on my studies. Tomorrow I take a bus for Vishine, the town near Castle Cachtice. There I shall probably have no trouble hiring a guide to the castle.
(Muses a moment)
I shall have to have Laura...
(Coughs)
...uh, Ms. Sheridan come down here as soon as possible. Then I can set up an appointment, if need be, at the Academy.

(Lights shift to interior Entrance of Castle Cachtice, as Renfield rises and
crosses).

RENFIELD
(Looking around)
HELLO! HELLO! Can you here me?!

(He crosses to the center).

RENFIELD
Hello?!

(He starts fiddling with his camcorder. Enter Bathory from another room
unseen by Renfield. She smiles at him. He suddenly looks up and sees her. He
is suprised).

RENFIELD
Hello. Do you speak English?

BATHORY
Among other languages.

RENFIELD
(Shutting off the camcorder)
I assume you are not the watchman. Have you seen him?

BATHORY
(Amused)
Him? You assume it is a man?

RENFIELD
Well...I did think...

BATHORY
(Laughs)
No, you are quite right. I am not the watchman. And it is a man. I haven’t seen him recently, though.

RENFIELD
Oh.

BATHORY
If you like I could show you around. I know the castle very well.

RENFIELD
Oh, I wouldn’t like to impose.

BATHORY
It would not be an imposition. I would enjoy it.

RENFIELD
Thank you very much.

BATHORY
Come.
(She turns back to from where she came)
Is there any special area you would like to see first.

RENFIELD
I shall follow your lead.

BATHORY
Very good.

(She turns and exits. Renfield follows. Lights shift to a dungeon of the
castle lit by torches. Enter Bathory and Renfield. Renfield looks around).

BATHORY
I’m afraid it is too dark for your video.

RENFIELD
Nowadays, you can use them in pretty low light.

(He turns on the camcorder, but there is something wrong. He fiddles with it a moment).

RENFIELD
Only I seem to have used up another battery.
(Looks puzzled)
Strange. I just put a fresh one on when we were in the first tower. It shouldn’t have run out already.

BATHORY
(Ominously)
Stranger things have happened in this castle.
(Indicates the surroundings)
Right here, in fact. If these walls could talk.

RENFIELD
(Looking around)
I know.

BATHORY
Oh?

RENFIELD
(Looking at her)
I’ve done a bit of research on one of the former occupants.

BATHORY
Really?

RENFIELD
Yes. That’s why I’m here, specifically.

(She smiles wickedly, as he looks around some more).

BATHORY
The Blood Countess?

RENFIELD
(Sheepishly)
Well, yes, I’m afraid so.
(Looks at his feet)
I suppose there are a lot of curiosity seekers milling about here all the time.

BATHORY
Yes. But you have the air of a scholar.

RENFIELD
(Looks up)
Yes, it is more than idle curiosity.

BATHORY
(Moving closer)
You want to know more?

RENFIELD
(Emphatic)
Yes. Yes I would.

BATHORY
(Turning away)
Shall I show you something?

RENFIELD
(Trying not to be too eager)
If you like.

(Bathory crosses to behind a covered table
[NOTE: in ward scenes appeared as sleeping patient],
removes cover, revealing a Satanic altar).

RENFIELD
(Surprised)
What’s this?

BATHORY
(Matter of factly)
An altar.

RENFIELD
(Wary)
I understand that. What I mean is, what is it doing here?

BATHORY
I put it here.

(Beat. Bathory smiles).

RENFIELD
(Guardedly)
Why?

BATHORY
I wish to raise a spirit.

RENFIELD
And why are you showing me this?

BATHORY
I want your help.

RENFIELD
Oh?

BATHORY
I thought you were eager to learn.

RENFIELD
Yes, but...

BATHORY
But?

RENFIELD
This could be dangerous.

BATHORY
(Laughs as crosses around front of altar)
Come now, Mr. Renfield, you wouldn’t want to pass up experience of a lifetime, would you?

(Beat).

RENFIELD
What I do want to "pass up on" is the death of me.

BATHORY
You think I'd risk your life?

RENFIELD
No offence, but I do think you have your own agenda.

BATHORY
Quite true. But leaving an unexplained corpse would not suit my agenda.

RENFIELD
And there are other risks, besides death.

BATHORY
A full life is full of risk.

RENFIELD
Touche.
(Beat. Cautiously)
What do you want me to do?

BATHORY
(Smiling)
I need a medium for the spirit to speak through. I want you to be that medium.

(Pause as Renfield has an internal dialogue. Bathory watches him closely).

RENFIELD
And do you know what to do should something go wrong?

BATHORY
I am well-versed in the Art. I wouldn't attempt it otherwise.
(Beat)
It is a risk for me, too.

RENFIELD
Yes, true.
(Steeling himself)
Alright.
(Beat)
I’ll give it a try.

BATHORY
Splendid.

RENFIELD
What do I do?

BATHORY
I want you to lie atop the altar.

(Renfield looks at the altar, hesitates, then crosses to it. Bathory watches
him as he gingerly climbs up onto it, laying down on his back).

BATHORY
Comfortable?

RENFIELD
(Forces a laugh)
Not really.

BATHORY
Just try to relax. Let my words flow over you. Like water.

RENFIELD
Alright.

(Bathory crosses to the head of the altar (above Renfield’s head) and faces him).

BATHORY
(Chanting)
Spirit of Vlad Tepes,
thou mayest now approach the gates of the east
to answer truly my liege demands.
Berald, Beroald, Balbin!
Gab, Gabor, Agaba!
Arise, arise I charge and command thee.

(She circles to the (her) right side of the altar).

BATHORY
(Cirles him through following)
By the Mysteries of the deep,
(Strikes her left hand with her right)
by the flames of Banal,
(Strikes)
by the power of the east,
(Strikes)
and by the silence of the night,
(Stikes)
by the holy rites of Hecate,
(Strikes)
I conjure and exorcise thee, spirit Dracula,
(Skrikes)
to present thyself here,
(Strikes)
and answer truly my demands.
(Strikes)
So mote it be!
(Strikes)

(From her clothing she takes dust, which she tosses over Renfield).

BATHORY
Prince Vlad Tepes Dracula!
(Beat, then louder)
Prince Vlad Tepes Dracula!!
(A wind blows out the torches).

BATHORY
PRINCE VLAD TEPES DRACULA!!!

(Pause. Sound like thunder, flashes of light. A huge shadow looms upstage, reaching across towards Renfield. Torches “re—light”. A vague figure appears
at the far end of the room. It fades, then a light appears on Renfield.
Beat. Bathory steps back from the altar).

BATHORY
Dracula arise!

(Renfield rises stiffly from the altar. He spreads his arms, taking a deep breath).

RENFIELD
I...AM...DRA-CU—LA!

(He roars with laughter. Lights fade to black).

[NOTE: the license to depart should be used afterwards - in such a way as to
be unintelligable to the audience:

Go, go, departed shade Vlad Tepes
by Omgroma Epin Sayoc
Satony, Degony, Eparigon
Galiganori, Zogogen, Ferstigon.
We license thee depart into thy proper place
and be there peace between us evermore.
So mote it be!]

(Lights back to hospital. Renfield begins to "withdraw" back into his
catatonic state. Ward and Hesselius grab him, and lead him to the chair and
sit him down).

WARD
(Disappointed)
Instead of reliving what happened, we get a fantasy.

HESSELIUS
Don't be too sure it's fantasy.

WARD
Oh come now. You can't believe any of that really happened, except in his mind.

HESSELIUS
"There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophies, Horatio."

WARD
(Exhaling disgustedly)
Nonsense. It's either a fantasy version of what happened, or an hallucination.

HESSELIUS
Don't be so close-minded, Doctor.

WARD
I don't have time for fairytales.

HESSELIUS
You think the great Religion of Science has explained everything?

WARD
Science and religion are two totally separate issues.

HESSELIUS
Not when subjected to narrow-minded belief.

WARD
(Terse)
I deal in facts. Hard facts. Not superstition.

HESSELIUS
Actually, you deal in theories. Mostly theories. A few facts. Little explanation. Plenty of unanswered questions.

WARD
But...

HESSELIUS
But? But what?

WARD
You believe what?! That he's possessed?!

(Hesselius shrugs. Beat)

WARD
I'm going to go back to my office. Will you join me?

HESSELIUS
Certainly. I would like to talk with you more about this.

(They exit. Beat. Enter Laura, also a patient. She dances around Renfield).

LAURA
(Whispering in his ear)
Well, my love, feeling quieter today? Mmmm?

(Pause. Renfield does not respond).

LAURA
(Standing behind him)
It wasn’t nice of you to go off and leave me, you know.
(Puts her arms around his neck)
I missed you.
(Pouting)
You were with her, weren’t you?
(Looks around at him)
Well? What have you to say for yourself?
(Turns away)
Yes, of course, she is your obsession.
(Turns back to him)
But is that any excuse?
(Beat)
What? Don’t want to talk with your lover? I want to talk with you.
(Caresses his hair)
I’d like to do quite a bit to you.

(During the last statement Ward enters.)

WARD
Laura?

(She spins about. Ward crosses to her.)

WARD
What are doing?
(Beat)
Did I hear you say something, Laura? Were you talking to Mr. Renfield?

(Laura says nothing, just looks at Ward, backing up a few steps).

WARD
(Sighing)
I’m sorry Laura.

(Beat. Ward crosses slowly to Laura, who cowers slightly. Ward smooths Laura’s
hair, and straightens her hospital gown.)

WARD
You have a visitor today. Your Mother is here. I hope you will remain calm.
(Reaching out a hand)
Come, I’ll take you to the visitors lounge, okay?
(Leading Laura out).
You want to see her, don’t you?
(Laura doesn’t respond)
Well, let’s go, alright.

(They exit. Lights fade low, spot up, as Renfield enters it).

RENFIELD
Off to Mama you go
Sweet, sweet child
Let her fold you up
In her smothering arms
She’ll keep you safe
From the big bad wolf

(He laughs, which draws out into a howl, as he dances about. After a moment,
Laura enters, as if in a trance, crosses to Right of Renfield’s chair.
Renfield crosses to behind her, wrapping his arms around her, licks her
neck. She breaks away, runs into the spot).

LAURA
(Frightened)
Richard has disappeared! Where is he? What happened to him?

(Covers her face with her hands. Beat).

LAURA
(Slowly putting hands down)
And now they’ve found him. But...
(Anguish)
...he’s changed. So changed. They say he’s sick, but...
(Intense)
...they don’t see what I see.
(Looks to side)
And then the dreams started.

(She closes her eyes. Lights fade to moonlight. A mist swirls about the room.
Out of the mist emerges Renfield, looking demonic. Laura runs to him, hugs him. He smiles. She dances about. He laughs. She crosses back to the bed,
looking over her shoulder. She lies down. He crosses to the bed, lays down
on top of her. Moonhight down, beat [Renfield exits], lightS up, as Laura
falls to the floor. Pause. Ward enters, sees Laura, runs to her, kneeling
beside her).

WARD
Laura!

(Checks her vitals. Enter Hesselius. Ward turns, sees him, as he rushes over
to them).

HESSELIUS
What has, happened?

WARD
I’m not sure. Help me cry her a bed.

(They lift Laura up and onto the beds).

WARD
Her mother visited her today. It must have upset her more than I thought.

HESSELIUS
What is wrong with her?

WARD
Total withdrawal. After the mysterious disappearance of Mr. Renfield, to whom she was an assistant, she became delusional. Now she refuses to speak.
(Looks thoughtfully at Laura)
Although, I could have sworn she spoke to your friend, Mr. Renfield.

HESSELIUS
(A look of surprise)
Really?
(Considers this)
Most interesting.
(Beat)
And what sort of delusions was she having?

(Ward leads Hessehius from Laura’s bedside.)

WARD
She believed Mr. Renfield was taken by demons, and that he had come to her, that he needed her blood.

(Hesselius looks over at Laura).

WARD
Also, she seems to have anemia, but I strongly feel there’s far more to it, though I can’t figure out what. The night before last, an orderly entered the room when he heard strange noises and Laura went into violent hysterics. They had to restrain her before they could give her a sedative.

(Hesselius frowns).

HESSELIUS
Have you been able to get her to open up at any point?

WARD
No. She hasn’t talked since she was brought in, excepting her fit the other night.

HESSELIUS
Most curious.

(They cross to door).

HESSELIUS
I’d like to observe her tonight. Can that be arranged?

WARD
(Opening the door and letting Hesselius exit)
Certainly, Doctor. We have the place fully video-monitored.

(Ward exits after Hesselius. Lights down, spot up. Ward steps into spot).

WARD
Case study #13645. Richard Renfield. Psychic Researcher. Captured in a homicidal frenzy in a forest in the Czech Republic. After murdering one of the locals...
(Inhales)
...rather brutally, near a castle he visited the day before, he went missing for about eleven days. He had been working on a book about one Countess Elisabeth Bathory, popularly known as The Blood Countess.
(Looks troubled)
He left a videotape behind. I don’t know what to make of it.

WARD
It ends just as someone else arrived. It seems he kept taping afterwards, but the
most that can be made out are shadowy shapes. Can’t even tell if they’re human.
(Beat)
His things were found by the watchman in the morning. Later, Mr. Renfield was brought to us.
(Beat)
Then his friend and colleague Dr. Hesselius came, becoming involved with our treatment of him.
(Muses)
We were able to contact Ms. Laura Sheridan, now also our patient, who assisted Mr. Renfield. She came to visit him.

(Lights up as Hesselius enters).

WARD
You watched Renfield’s video?

HESSELIUS
Yes

WARD
Ms. Sheridan also kept a video journal.

(Ward starts VIDEO. Laura sitting at a table).

LAURA (VIDEO)
(Troubled)
I saw Richard today.
(Beat)
It’s the first time since he was put into the hospital. He seems just the same. He doesn’t respond to anything. I haven’t seen his video yet. Dr. Ward gave me a copy. I will watch it tonight. Maybe it will give me some clue as to what happened to him.
(Beat)
I have a sense of foreboding.

(Video CUTS to later, Laura at table, looking unwell).

LAURA (VIDEO)
(Stammmering)
I don’t know...what to...
(Beat)
I think the good doctor cut the tape short, but...
(Looks directly .iDto camera)
Who was that behind Richard? I must insist Dr. Ward show me the end of the tape. I must know.
(Beat)
I must find out what really happened.

(Ward turns the tape off).

WARD
I explained there wasn’t any more on the tape, of course. I don’t know that she believed me. In light of her breakdown since, I suspect she didn’t.

(Turns VIDEO back on. Laura on her couch. She looks dishevelled).

LAURA (VIDEO)
Things are bad. I had a strange dream last night.

(Upstage: Laura rises, sleepwalks to “window” as Bathory enters the “window”
covers Laura. F.O.).

LAURA (VIDEO)
This morning I had two puncture wounds on my throat.
(Beat)
I believe that the thing which appeared behind Renfield was a malevolent spirit of some kind.
(Beat)
Dare I suggest that it is...
(Struggling with the words)
Crazy as it sounds...
(She buries her face in her hands, then looks up)
...I think it is a...vampire.

WARD
(Pausing the video again)
I don’t know how this really fits in with what happened to Renfield, or his disappearence, but Laura Sheridan to know something.

HESSELIUS
What do you mean?

WARD
Her video continues.

(Ward re-starts the VIDEO - CUT to Laura sitting on her bed, looking haggard).

LAURA (VIDEO)
Another dream.

(As following she reacts to remembering, by end burying her head in her hands:
Upstage: Moonlight. Laura enters it, as if in a trance, Bathory comes up
behind her, takes her in her from behind, enveloping her in her coat, pulls
her head back, and bites her in the throat. B.O.
She raises her head, tears running down her face).

LAURA (VIDEO)
I know what I must do.

(She turns off the VIDEO camera. Ward shuts off the VIDEO).

WARD
That’s it.

HESSELIUS
Did you find out what she meant by that last statement?

WARD
No. She hasn’t talked since they brought her to us. And her doctor could not shed any light for us.

HESSELIUS
(Perturbed)
Yet another mystery among many.

WARD
It’s like a crazy jigsaw puzzle for which we have only a few pieces.

(They exit. Lights shift to the castle dungeon. Enter Bathory, followed by
Renfield, who’s on the verge of mania. The sun rises, and Renfield begins to
spasm, falls to the floor, where he writhes, then becomes still. Bathory
just watches him, amused. After a moment he regains consciousness, slowly
gets up on his knees, as if his body hurts all over. He looks up at Bathory).

RENFIELD
(Whimpering)
What have you done to me?

BATHORY
(Chuckling maliciously)
What I please.

RENFIELD
(Pleading)
Make the pain stop!

(Bathory laughs out loud. Renfield drops down, and cries out).

BATHORY
Stop your whining, boy. You will do as I bid. Your will is to serve me. Do you understand?

RENFIELD
(Trying to rise again)
NO!!!

(Bathory crosses to him, grabs him by the hair, pulls his head back, anger
flaring up).

BATHORY
YES! I will bode resistance!
(Letting him go)
You will suffer much otherwise.
(Standing hautily)
Do you understand?

RENFIELD
(Meekly crumpling)
Yes.

(She puts a foot on his back, pushing him down hard).

BATHORY
When I beckon, you will come. When I command, you will do. If I wish it, you will die.
(She leans closer to him)
Understand?

RENFIELD
(Barely audible)
Yes.

(Bathory uprights herself, and laughs. F.O.).



END OF ACT I

Sunday, April 4, 2010

Act II of THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS

THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-35





ACT II



Scene 1: (A grove at midnight. Enter Faustus. He
crosses to the center).

FAUSTUS
Now, begin the incantations, and see it devils will obey my command. Within this circle is Yahweh’s name, forward and backward anagrammatised, figures of every adjunct to the Heavens, and characters of signs and erring stars, by which the spirits are enforced to rise: then fear not, be resolute, and try the uttermost magic can perform.

(He stands in the center of the circle, him arms spread out).

FAUSTUS
(Recites)
Sint mihi Dei Acherontis propitil! Valeat numen triplex Jehovae! Ignei, airii, aquatani spiritus, terra! Beelzebub, interni monarcha, et Demogorgon, proitiamus vos, ut appareat et surgat spiritus.
(Looks around expectantly. Nothing happens)
Why do you delay?
(Recites)
Per Jehovam, Gehennam, et consecratum aquam quam nunc spargo, signumque crucis quod nunc taclo, et per vota nostra, ipse nunc surgat nobis dicatus spiritus!

(Enter Mephostophiles in devilish form[shadow projection]. Faustus cries out).

FAUSTUS
(On the verge of panic)
I charge you to return and change your shape! You are too ugly to attend on me! Go,
and return in human form; that shape becomes a devil best.

(Mephostophiles exits in a flash).

FAUSTUS
(Calmer)
Now, I am conjurer laureate, for indeed I have power in the raising of spirits.

(Enter Mephostophiles in human form).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-36


MEPHOSTOPHILES
Now, Faustus, what wouldst thou have me to do?

FAUSTUS
I charge you wait upon me while I live, to do whatever I command.

MEPH.
I am one of many, and may not follow thee without leave.

FAUSTUS
Did not my conjuring raise you?

MEPH.
No, I came hither of mine own accord, for the shortest cut for conjuring is stoutly to
abjure Christian doctrine, and pray to the Devil.

FAUSTUS
So I have already done.

MEPH.
But for my service, thou must promise thy soul to us.

FAUSTUS
My soul?
(Beat)
Why?

MEPH.
Yes, Faustus, thy soul.

FAUSTUS
What need have you with my soul?

MEPH.
To expand out empire.

FAUSTUS
I will not be damned for your sake.

MEPH.
(Mocking)
Wilt thou not agree? For thee no plea?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-37


FAUSTUS
A pox on you! Hence! Begone!

(Meph. begins to slowly withdraw, chuckling maliciously).

FAUSTUS
(Hesitates)
Wait, spirit!

MEPH.
(Stopping)
Yes?

FAUSTUS
What is your name?

MEPH.
Thou may calleth me Mephostophiles.

FAUSTUS
(Takes a moment to steel his nerves)
Mephostophiles, go bear tidings to great Beelzebub. Say Faustus does honour to him,
and wishes to know of his world. Then meet me in my study at two o’clock, and then
resolve me of your master’s mind.

MEPH.
(Amused)
I will, Faustus.

(Meph. exits).

FAUSTUS
Now that I have set in motion what I desire, I’ll live in speculation of this art till Mephostophiles return again.

[2] (As Faustus crosses, lights shift to study. He sits at his desk. Begins reading. Beat).

FAUSTUS
(Looking up from his books)
Now, Faustus, must this need be damned, and can I not be saved. What advantage
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-38


FAUSTUS (CONT’D)
then to think of God or Heaven? Now go not backward; no, be resolute. Why waver?
Oh, something sounds in mine ears.

INNER VOICE OF FAUSTUS
Abjure this magic, turn to God again!

FAUSTUS
To God? -- he loves me not -- the God I serve is mine own appetite.

VOICE
Sweet Faustus, leave that dangerous art.

FAUSTUS
When Mephostophiles shall stand by me, what God can hurt me? I am safe; harbor no
more doubts.

VOICE
(Faint)
Repent! Yet God will pity you.

FAUSTUS
No! I must proceed.
(Beat)
Come, Mephostophiles, and bring glad tidings from great Beelzebub. Veni, veni,
Mephostophiles!

(Meph. enters. Faustus rises).

FAUSTUS
Now tell me, what says Beelzebub your lord?

MEPH.
We have determined that I shall wait on Faustus whilst he lives.
(Beat)
And he shall buy my service with his soul.

FAUSTUS
(Uncertain)
My soul?
(Beat)
What would become of my soul?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-39


MEPH.
Thou shalt become one with us.

FAUSTUS
And would I know any torment?

MEPH.
Tush, Faustus, those are but fairy tales.

FAUSTUS
(Paces back and forth for a minute, then giving in)
Yes, Mephostophiles. I give it to you.

MEPH.
But, Faustus, thou must bequeath it solemnly.

FAUSTUS
Oh? Very well. Faustus allies himself to the Devil, to serve his glory on Earth, so he
will let him live in all voluptuousness: having you ever to attend upon me; to give me
whatsoever I demand, to slay mine enemies, and aid my friends, always be obedient
to my will.

MEPH.
But, Faustus, thou must write it in manner of a deed of gift, and sign with thine own
blood.

FAUSTUS
(Sighs)
So I will.

(He takes a piece of parchment, and writes).

FAUSTUS
But, Mephostophiles, my hand is stilled, and I can write no more.
(Looking at his hand)
What might the staying of my hand mean? Is it unwilling I should write this bill? Is not my soul mine own? Then write again, Faustus gives to you his soul.

MEPH.
Come, Faustus, set it on.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-40


FAUSTUS
(Reads as writes)
I, Georg Sabel, Doctor Faustus, do publicly declare with mine own hand in covenant
and by power of these presents:
(Meph. circles around as he continues)
Whereas, mine own spiritual faculties having been exhaustively explored, I still cannot comprehend. And whereas, it being my wish to probe further into the matter, I do propose to speculate upon the Elementa; whereas mankind doth not teach such things, therefore have I summoned the spirit who calleth himself Mephostophiles, a servant of Hell, charged with informing and instructing me, and agreeing against a promissory instrument hereby transferred unto him to be subservient and obedient to me in all things. I do promise him in return that, when I be fully sated of that which I desire of him, he may at such a time and in whatever manner pleaseth him order, ordain, reign, rule and possess all that may be mine: body, property, flesh, blood, etc., herewith duly bound over In eternity and surrendered by covenant in mine own hand by authority and power of these presents, as well as of my mind, brain, intent, blood and will. I do now defy all human laws, all the Christian dogma and all restriction, and this must be.

MEPH.
Now sign in thine own blood.

FAUSTUS
(Takes a penknife and cuts his hand)
Doctor Faustus, the Adept in Elementa and in Church Doctrine.

MEPH.
Speak, Faustus, dost thou deliver this as thy deed?

FAUSTUS
Yes, take it, and the Devil give you good on it.

MEPH.
Now, Faustus, ask what thou wilt.

FAUSTUS
(After thinking a moment)
Let me have a wife. The fairest maid in Germany, for I am wanton and lascivious, and
cannot live without a wife.

MEPH.
How -- a wife? I prithee, Faustus, talk not of a wife. Marriage is but a ceremonial toy.
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-41


MEPH. (CONT’D)
I'll cull thee out the fairest courtesans, and bring them every morning to thy bed; she whom thine eye shall like, thy heart shall have.

(Faustus glowers lasciviously. Meph laughs, causing Faustus to look uncertain.
Faustus sits at his desk, and muses. Meph. reaches into darknes and pulls out
a book).

MEPH.
(Handing him the book)
Here, Faustus, take this book, peruse it thoroughly: the iterating of these lines brings gold.

(Faustus peruses the book).

MEPH.
(Pointing in book)
The framing of this circle on the ground brings whirlwinds, tempests, thunder and
lightning.

(Faustus turns more pages. Meph. stops him).

MEPH.
Pronounce this thrice devoutly to thyself, and men in armour shall appear to thee,
ready to execute what thou desirest.

FAUSTUS
Thanks, Mephostophlles; yet I would have a book wherein I might behold all spells
and incantations, that I might raise up spirits when I please.

MEPH.
(Indicates book)
Here they are, in this book.

FAUSTUS
(Nodding, looking though book)
Now would I have a book where I might see all characters and planets of the heavens,
that I might know their motions and dispositions.

MEPH.
(Turning pages)
Here they are too.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-42


FAUSTUS
Nay, let me have one book more -- and then I shall be done -- wherein I might see all
plants, herbs, and trees that grow upon the earth.

MEPH.
(Pressing finger firmly on book)
Here they be.

(Faustus looks satisfied).

FAUSTUS
Now will I question you about hell. Tell me where is this place that men call hell?

MEPH.
(Bored)
Under the heavens.

FAUSTUS
Yes, but whereabouts?

MEPH.
Within the bowels of these elements. Hell hath no limits, nor is circumscribed in one
self place: for where we are is hell, and where hell is there must we ever be. And, to
conclude, when all the world dissolves, and every creature shall be purified, all places shall be hell that is not heaven.

FAUSTUS
Come, I think hell’s a fable.

MEPH.
Ay, think so still, till experience change thy mind.

FAUSTUS
Why, think you then that I shall be damned?

MEPH.
(Amused)
Ay, of necessity, for here’s the scroll wherein thou hast given thy soul to us.

FAUSTUS
Yes, and body too: but what of that? You think that I am so foolish as to imagine that,
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-43


FAUSTUS (CONT’D)
after this life, there is any pain? Tush, these are trifles, and mere old wives’ tales. But, leave these vain trifles of men’s souls. Tell me, what is that Lucifer, your overlord?

MEPH.
There is no Lucifer.

FAUSTUS
Was not Lucifer an angel once?

MEPH.
(Amused)
No, Faustus.

FAUSTUS
How comes it then that he is Prince of devils?

MEPH.
We have no such Prince.

FAUSTUS
Then what are you?

MEPH.
Spirits enslaved by the Old Ones.

FAUSTUS
Where are you damned?

MEPH.
In what thou callest hell.

FAUSTUS
How comes it then that you are out of hell?

MEPH.
Why this is hell, nor am I out of it. Thinkest thou that I who soared in the firmament, am not tormented with ten thousand hells, in being chained to this rock? 0 Faustus, leave these frivolous demands, for thy soul may not withstand such force.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-44

FAUSTUS
What, is great Mephostophiles so passionate for being deprived of the joys of heaven?
(Beat)
Tell me who made the world?

MEPH.
I know not.

FAUSTUS
Sweet Mephostophiles, tell me.

MEPH.
Move me not, for I cannot tell thee.

FAUSTUS
Villain, have I not bound you to tell me anything?

MEPH.
Think thou on hell, Faustus, for thou art ours.

FAUSTUS
Think, Faustus, upon God that made the world.

MEPH.
(Smiling maliciously, calls aside)
Lilith.

(Enter Lilith, dancing about Faustus. Meph. moves into shadowj

LILITH
Too late. If thou repent, devils shall tear thee in pieces.

FAUSTUS
Who are you?

LILITH
(Swelling)
I am Pride.

(Faustus looks bewildered).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-45


LILITH
(Grabbing at his book)
I am Covetousness, begotten of an old churl.

(Faustus pulls away, protecting his book).

LILITH
(Enraged)
I am Wrath. I was born in hell; and look to it, for some of thou shalt be my father.

FAUSTUS
(Confused)
Away to hell, to hell!

(Lilith crosses to him).

LILITH
(Pulling and sniffing at his clothes)
I am Envy. I cannot read, and therefore wish all books were burnt. I am lean with seei
ng others eat.

(She turns away, hugging her stomach).

LILITH
I am Gluttony.
(Imploring sweetness)
Faustus, wilt thou bid me to supper?

FAUSTUS
No, I’ll see you hanged: you would eat up all my food.

LILITH
(Sullen)
Then the Devil choke thee!

FAUSTUS
Choke yourself, glutton!

LILITH
(Languoring)
I am Sloth.
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-46


LILITH (CONT’D)
(As she lays upon the floor)
I was begotten on a sunny bank, where I have lain ever since.

(She falls asleep. Faustus leans over her. She reaches an arm up around his
neck, lasciviously).

FAUSTUS
(Nervously)
What are you now, Mistress Minx?

LILITH
Who, I, sir? The first letter of my name begins with L.

(She licks his face he jumps back, she laughs, looking seductive. Meph. steps
forward).

MEPH.
Tell me, Faustus, how dost thou like thy wife?

FAUSTUS
(Incensed)
A plague on her for a hot whore!

(Lilith rises, crosses to Faustus, caressing him; he succumbs, they kiss passionately, she pulls him onto the floor, as following: spot up, as Klinge steps into it).

KLINGE
(Reads)
“Hans Muller, chamberlain to the Bishop of Bamberg, annual accounts from Walpurgis
1519 to Walpurgis 1520. Entry on February 12, 1520, underthe heading “Miscellaneous.” 10 gulden given and presented as a testimonial to Doctor Faustus, the philosopher, who made for my master a horoscope or prognostication. Paid on the Sunday after Saint Scholastica’s Day by the order of his reverence.”

[3] (Spot down, Klinge exits. Lilith rises crosses off. Faustus lays on his back.
Meph. comes out of shadows).

FAUSTUS
When I behold the heavens, then I repent, and curse you, wicked Mephostophiles,
because you have deprived me of those joys.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-47


MEPH.
Why, Faustus, thinkest thou heaven is such a glorious thing?

FAUSTUS
(Rises)
If it were made for man, it was made for me; I will renounce this magic and repent.

(Faustus crosses and sits at his desk, brooding. Meph. merely looks on).

FAUSTUS
(To himself)
My heart’s so hardened I cannot repent. Scarce can I name salvation, faith, or heaven,
but fearful echoes thunder in mine ears.
(Clamps his hands over his ears)
Why should I die? Or despair?
(Standing)
Come, Mephostophiles, let us dispute again, and argue on astrology. Tell me, are
there many heavens above the moon? Are all celestial bodies but one globe, as is the
substance of this centric earth?

MEPH.
As are the elements, such are the spheres mutually folded in each other’s orb, whose
terminine is termed the Universum.

FAUSTUS
But tell me, have they all one motion, both in direction and in time?

MEPH.
All jointly move in circular poles, but differ in their motion of time.

FAUSTUS
Tush, these are freshman’s suppositions. But tell me, hath every sphere a dominion?

MEPH.
Ay.

FAUSTUS
How many heavens, or spheres, are there?

MEPH.
Many: the planets round the sun, the sun with other suns and others like to make up
the Universe. And beyond.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1-48


FAUSTUS
(Looking puzzled)
Well, resolve me in this question: why have we not conjunctions, oppositions, aspects,
eclipses, all at one time, but in some years we have more, in some less?

MEPH.
On account of their unequal motion in relation to the whole.

FAUSTUS
(Bewildered)
Well, I am answered.

(Faustus turns away, brooding).

MEPH.
Remember this...

FAUSTUS
Go, accursed spirit, to hell, It is you have damned my distressed soul.
(To himself)
Is it not too late?
(Looking heavenward)
Ah, Christ, my saviour, seek to save my soul.

(Enter Lilith - with mirror face).

LILITH
Christ will not save thy soul, there’s none but we that have interest in the same.

FAUSTUS
Oh! Who are you?!

LILITH
I am Lilith, come to show thee hell.

(Lilith grabs Faustus, the lights flash, Lilith carries Faustus around as strange shadows dance about. Lilith leads Faustus to the mirror, where
Faustus sees a demonic version of himself. Faustus faints, falls to the
floor.
[4] Lights down: lights of the heavens. Stars swirling round as Faustus looks in wonder with Lilith at his side).










THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/1,2-49


FAUSTUS
The earth looks so small from here.

LILITH
So it is.

(F.O.).





Scene 2 [5]: Spotup. Klinge steps into).

KLINGE
From the Records of the City of lngolstadt:
(Reads)
“a. Minute on the actions of the city council in lngolstadt. Today, the Wednesday after
St. Vitus’ Day, 1528. The soothsayer shall be ordered to leave the city and to spend
his penny elsewhere.
b. Record of those banished from lngolstadt. On Wednesday after St. Vitus’ Day, 1528,
a certain man who called himself Dr. Georg Faustus of Heidelberg was told to spend
his penny elsewhere and he pledged himself not to take vengeance on or make fools
of the uthorltIes for this order.”
(Shuffles papers)
And an entry from the journal of Kilian Lieb, July 1528,
(Reads)
Georg Faustus of Helmstet said on the fifth of June that when the sun and Jupiter are
in the same constellation prophets are born, presumably such as he. He asserted that
he was the commander or preceptor of the order of the Knights of St. John at a place
called Hallestein on the border of Carinthia.

(Klinge steps out of the spot, Wagner steps into it, holding old mask before
his face).

WAGNER
Learned Faustus, to know the secrets of astronomy, writ in the stars, did explore the
heavens.

(Lights up on Faustus and Meph. at the desk, working on puppets. Wagner
lowers his mask and crosses to them).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/2-50


FAUSTUS
Then, my son Wagner, we passed the stately town of Treves, environed round with airy
mountaintops. From Paris next, coasting the realm of France; we saw the river Maine
tall into the Rhine, then up to Naples, rich Campania, where we saw learned Virgil’s
golden tomb. Then to Venice, Padua, and the rest. Thus have I spent my time.

(Faustus and Meph. each lift a marionette -- representing Faustus and the Pope
-- which they manipulate: Faustus-puppet introduces himself to the Pope-
puppet, who is frightened by his sudden appearance, and starts running away.
Faustus-puppet chases him, kicking him in the butt -- all the while Faustus
is laughing; during the following:)

WAGNER
(Laughs at the show, then raises the mask)
Faustus went to prove cosmography, first arriving at Rome, to see the Pope, and manner of his court.
(Lowers mask again to laugh)

[6] (Meph. puts Pope-puppet away, pulls out Emperor & Knight puppets: Emperor-
puppet on the throne, laughing; Knight-puppet gesticulating annoyance to one
side. Faustus-puppet conjures Alexander the Great -- another puppet[different
from the others]. The Emperor-puppet jumps up and down with joy; the Knight-
puppet scoffs. Faustus-puppet conjures Alexander-puppet away, bows, then
conjures a pair of horns onto the Knight-puppet’s head, which makes the
Emperor-puppet roll with laughter. The Knight-puppet storms about, pulling at
the horns, until the Emperor-puppet signals Faustus-puppet to release him.
Faustus-puppet bows, and conjures the horns away; all during the following:)

WAGNER
(Raises the mask)
When Faustus had with pleasure viewed rarest things, and royal courts of kings, he
stayed his course, and returned home.
(Lowers mask to laugh, then raises it again)
His friends, and nearest companions, did greet his safe return with kind words, and in
their conference of his journey through the world and air, they put forth questions of
Astrology.
(Lowers and raises mask)
Faustus answered with such learned skill, that they admired and wondered at his wit.
Now his tame spread forth in every land; amongst the rest is the Emperor, Charles the
Fifth, at whose palace Faustus feasted amongst his noblemen.

(Wagner lowers mask, as Faustus recovers from laughing, and Meph. takes the
puppets).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/2-51


FAUSTUS
How now, Wagner, what’s the news?

WAGNER
Sir, the Count of Anhalt earnestly entreats your company.

FAUSTUS
The Count of Anhalt! An honourable gentleman, to whom I must demonstrate my cunning. Come, let’s away.

(They cross off, as spot up, Klinge steps into it).

KLINGE
(Reads)
“Entry in the Records of the City Council of Nuremberg. May 10, 1532. Safe conduct to
Doctoaustus, the great sodomite and necromancer, at Furth refused.”
I also have report of how this wretch was taken prisoner at Batenburg on the Maas,
near the border of Geldem, while the Baron Hermann was away, was treated rather
leniently by his chaplain, Dr. Johannes Dorstenius, because he promised the man,
who was good but not shrewd, knowledge of many things and various arts. Hence he
kept drawing him wine, by which Faustus was very much exhilarated, until the vessel
was empty. When Faustus learned of this, and the chaplain told him that he was going
to Grave, that he might have his beard shaved, Faustus promised him another unusual
art by which his beard might be removed without the use of a razor, if he would provide more wine. When this condition was accepted, he told him to rub his beard vigorously with arsenic, but without any mention of its preparation. When the salve had been applied, there followed such an inflammation that not only the hair but also the skin and the flesh were burned oft. The chaplain himself told me of this piece of villainy more than once with much indignation.

[7] (Spot down, exit Klinge. Half light up on Faustus and the Countess coupling.
Meph. watches from the shadows. They take a breather).

COUNTESS
Believe me, Master Doctor, this merriment has much pleased me.

FAUSTUS
My gracious lady, I am glad it contents you so well. But, madam, what of your husband,
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/2-52


FAUSTUS (CONTD)
the Count? I have heard that great-bellied women have some longings.
(He rubs her pregnant belly)
What is it, madam? Tell me, and you shall have it.

COUNTESS
Thanks, good Master Doctor, for I see your courteous intent to pleasure me...
(She laughs, then stops It)
...I will not hide from you the thing my heart desires. And were it now summer, as it is January and the dead time of winter, I would desire no better meat...
(Laughs again)
...than a dish of ripe grapes.

FAUSTUS
That’s nothing! Mephostophiles, begone!

(Meph. withdraws).

FAUSTUS
Were it a greater thing than this, so it would content you, you should have it.

(Meph. re-enters with grapes, hands to Faustus)

FAUSTUS
(Handing them to her)
Here they be, madam. Take a taste.

COUNTESS
(Eating the grapes)
Believe me Master Doctor, this makes me wonder above the rest, that being in the
dead time of winter, and In the month of January, how you should come by these
grapes.

FAUSTUS
The year is divided into two spheres over the whole world, that, when it is here winter with us, in the contrary sphere it is summer and by means of a swift spirit that I have, I had them brought here, as you see. How do you like them, madam?

COUNTESS
Believe me, Master Doctor, they are the best grapes that I ever tasted in my life.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/2,3,4-53


FAUSTUS
I am glad that you find them so.

COUNTESS
While I live, I am beholding for this courtesy.

FAUSTUS
I humbly thank your ladyship.

COUNTESS
Come, Master Doctor, receive your reward.

(She pulls him into her arms. B.O.).





Scene 3 [8]: (A courtyard at dusk).

(Enter the Knight, weary. He stops to rest. From the opposite end enters Faustus, strolling leisurely. The Knight sees Faustus, draws his sword and stands to. Faustus sees the Knight and stops. The Knight threatens Faustus, brandishing his sword.He lunges. Faustus hops to one side, hitting him on
the back with his stick as he goes by. The Knight almost falls on his face,
but recovers. The Knight is now livid. He lifts his sword again in
readiness. Faustus grins mischievously. Meph. enters behind carrying a
cudgel, with which he bops the Knight on the head. The Knight wobbles around
and then spirals down to the ground, unconscious. Faustus laughs, crosses to
Meph., and they exit. F.O.).




Scene 4 [9]: (Faustus' study. Enter Faustus, and Wagner).

WAGNER
Master Doctor, since our conference about fair ladies, we have determined among
ourselves that Helen of Greece was the most beautiful lady that ever lived; therefore,
Master Doctor, it you will do us a favour, and use your art, so as to let us see that
beauty of Greece, whom all the world admires for majesty, we should think ourselves
beholding to you.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-54


FAUSTUS
My son, you shall behold that lady of Greece, as when Paris crossed the seas with her,
and brought the spoils to Troy. Be silent, then, for there’s danger in words.

(Faustus crosses to a draped mirror. He undrapes it, waves his hands in front
of it, as Wagner watches. Smoke fills the mirror then an image forms, Helen
of Greece, in the distance. She slowly approaches the mirror. She smiles at
the two men. Then the image fades. The two men stand enraptured).

WAGNER
Too simple is my wit to tell her praise, whom all the world admires for majesty.
Since I have seen the pride of Nature’s works and only paragon of excellence, I’ll take my leave, and for this wondrous sight happy thank you.

(Wagner exits. Faustus muses at the mirror. Beat. Enter Wagner, followed by
Klinge).

WAGNER
Doctor Klinge wishes your attendance, sir.

(Faustus breaks from his reverie. Wagner exits).

KLINGE
(Fierce)
Faustus, leave this damned art, this magic that will charm your soul to hell, and rob you of salvation. You have offended like a devil. Yet, sin by custom grows not in nature. Then, Faustus, will repentance come too late; then you are banished from the sight of heaven. No mortal can express the pains of hell. May be my exhortation seems harsh and all unpleasant. I speak not in envy of you, but in pity of your future misery. And so have hope that my rebuke, checking your body, may amend your soul. Even now, a certain witch you consorted with many years back, awaits the dawn when she is to burn at the stake.

FAUSTUS
(Fearful)
Where am I -- Faustus? Wretch, what have I done? Damned am I, damned; despair
and die!

KLINGE
Then call for mercy and avoid despair.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-55


FAUSTUS
(Recovers himself)
Ah, Brother, I feel your words comfort my distressed soul. Leave me a while to ponder
on my sins.

KLINGE
I go, Faustus, fearing the ruin of your hopeless soul.

(He exits).

FAUSTUS
(Despairing)
Where is mercy now? I do repent: and yet I do despair; hell strives with grace for conquest in my breast: what shall I do to shun the snares of death?
(Beat)
And what of sweet Gretchen? Is she to die? What am I to do? Let her die, wretched
and alone?

(Meph. enters).

MEPH.
Thou art a fool, Faustus, to heed this childish noise.

FAUSTUS
How could you understand? What do you know of mortality? Despite all I’ve learned,
theres still no certainty.

MEPH.
Hath not I told thee what to expect? Hath thou still not seen the light?

FAUSTUS
(Passionately)
I don’t know!
(Beat)
You tell me one thing, the Church another. How am I to be sure.

MEPH.
Hath not thine eyes witnessed for themselves?
(Beat)
Be resolute in thy will, Faustus.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-56

FAUSTUS
(Resolutely)
Take me to Gretchen. You must free her.

MEPH.
(Mocking)
Free her? Who was it that fondled her, then abandoned her?

FAUSTUS
(Taken aback)
What do you know of it? It was before I called upon you!

(Meph. just laughs).

FAUSTUS
(Angered)
Come! We must go to her! Now!

MEPH.
Very well, Faustus.

FAUSTUS
(Calling out as they exit)
Wagner!

[10] (They exit. Spot up on Gretchen, shaking and weeping. Faustus’ face appears
above her).

FAUSTUS
(Softly)
Gretchen.

GRETCHEN
(Startled)
What? You come already? It is too soon, too soon!

FAUSTUS
Hush, Gretchen. It is me. Georg.

GRETCHEN
What? Georg? Is it really you?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-57


FAUSTUS
Quiet. You’ll wake the guards. Yes, it’s Georg.

GRETCHEN
Did you win at cards that you come as my hangman? Or are you now father confessor? Isn’t the morning soon enough to die?

FAUSTUS
(To himself, anguished)
The pain rips at my heart.

GRETCHEN
Did you know we had a child, Master Doctor? A daughter. A beautiful daughter. But
they took her from me, saying I was a whore, and drove me from the village.

FAUSTUS
(Stunned)
What? A child?

GRETCHEN
(Laughing)
Men are such fools.
(Becoming angry)
If you are not here to speed my death, then let me to it in peace.

FAUSTUS
I have come to free you.

GRETCHEN
(Scoffing)
Why?

FAUSTUS
(Flustered)
Come, come with me.

GRETCHEN
No.

FAUSTUS
We must hurry, or we shall be lost.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-58


GRETCHEN
You don’t make sense. I am lost.
(Beat)
You are cold.

FAUSTUS
I’ll warm with the passion of your love. All I want is for you to follow me.

GRETCHEN
You press me. Please go.

FAUSTUS
(Reaching an arm in where he removed the bars)
Come with me, before the sun exposes us.

GRETCHEN
Don’t touch me. Don’t come near.

FAUSTUS
Let the past die. You are killing me with your words.

GRETCHEN
Go, and live. I must remain, and die.

FAUSTUS
Please! Come out with me.

GRETCHEN
Out there?

FAUSTUS
Into freedom.

GRETCHEN
There is no freedom free enough for me. Except death.

FAUSTUS
Don’t say such despairing things.

GRETCHEN
(Stands and looks up)
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-59


GRETCHEN (CONT’D)
I have despaired. I have been beaten down by the cruelties of the pious. My mother
died in madness. I was vilified by my brother. My child was stolen from me. I have been abandoned by my greatest love.

FAUSTUS
(Weakly)
I’ll be with you.

GRETCHEN
And what would I be? A whore? A beggar?
(Sits)
They’d surely catch me anyway.

FAUSTUS
Stop it! Come to your senses. Reach up your hand and you’re free.

GRETCHEN
Free?
(Laughs derisively)

FAUSTUS
I beg you. The dawn is coming.

WAGNER (OFF)
Doctor, beware, the watch comes near.

MEPH. (OFF-CLOSE)
Come, Faustus, leave her to her fate. It thou tarry, thou shalt share it.

(Faustus withdraws head and arm. F.O. Pause. Lights up on Faustus at his
[11] desk, Meph. standing behind him).

FAUSTUS
(Depressed)
How can I live with myself. That sweet creature murdered so horribly.

MEPH.
(Matter-of-factly)
She is not the first to be abused thusly.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-60


FAUSTUS
You revolting worm. She must have suffered so, beyond human comprehension.
(Looking askance at Meph.)
Far beyond your comprehension!

MEPH.
Tut, sweet Faustus, dost thou find thyself at the end of thy tether? Humans destroy
without sense, then go to pieces about it, when the damage is done.

FAUSTUS
Have you finished yet?

MEPH.
Thou thought of redemption, which is against our pact.

FAUSTUS
After seeing how murder is committed in the name of God, I have no desire to join
those wretches In “Paradise”.
(Beat)
Come, sweet Mephostophiles, pardon my unjust presumption. And with my blood
again I will confirm my former vow.

MEPH.
Do it then quickly, with unfeigned heart, lest greater danger do attend thy drift.

(Faustus picks picks up paper and pen, and writes).

FAUSTUS
(Reading what he writes)
I, Doctor Faustus, do declare in this mine own hand and blood: whereas I have truly
and strictly observed my first instrumentum and pact for these nineteen years, in
defiance of God and all mankind; pledging body and soul, Itherein did empower the
mighty God Lucifer with full authority over me so soon as the time be past; and where
as he hath further promised me to increase my days in death, thereby shortening my
days in Hell, also not to allow me to suffer any pain; now there-fore do I further promise him that I will never more heed the admonitions, teachings, scoldings, instructions or threats of fearful mankind; but particularly do I promise to heed no propagandist of religious dogma. In good faith and resolve contracted by these presents.

(He hands the paper to Meph.).










THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-61


FAUSTUS
Torment, my friend, that base and aged monk that would dissuade me from my path,
with the greatest torment that hell affords.

MEPH.
I shall.

(Faustus crosses to the covered mirror, and sits before it, becoming lost in
sad reverie).

MEPH.
What mayest I bring thee, Faustus?

FAUSTUS
One thing, good servant, let me ask of you, to satisfy the longing of my heart’s desire -- that I might have as my lover that heavenly Helen, which I saw of late.

MEPH.
Faustus, thinkest thou that Helen of Greece comes as easily as her reflection because
thou beckons? Let me calleth up Lilith, or some other sympathetic spirit to take Helen’s
shape.

FAUSTUS
That same old tune you play. A master you are of doubt and false deduction. I know it
only requires a muttered spell before we behold her before us.

MEPH.
She cometh of a different realm from which I tread.

FAUSTUS
Are there not spirits to act as mediator?

MEPH.
Perhaps.

(Lilith enters).
LILITH
I could be thy negotiant, Faustus.

FAUSTUS
You?!









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-62


LILITH
I have traversed many worlds.

FAUSTUS
But how can you help with spirits of the dead?

LILITH
For I too was once mortal.

FAUSTUS
Were you then not Adam’s first wife?

LILITH
(Amused)
So the story goes.

FAUSTUS
And did you not cavort with demons?

LILITH
(Laughs)
In mine life I was a great sorceress. The fearful condemned me for such, as they have
you.

FAUSTUS
(Relaxing a bit)
And you can commune with the dead?

LILITH
Necromancy was one of my many skills.

FAUSTUS
(Slightly hesitant)
Then, so be it.

LILITH
Then come with me.

(She takes Faustus by the hand, leads him across stage as the lights shift.
[12] Helen enters into the light, seemingly dazed).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-63


FAUSTUS
Was this the face that launched a thousand ships and burnt the topless towers of Ilium?

LILITH
Hold thy tongue. This realm is dangerous for such as thou.

HELEN
(Unfocused, injured dignity)
Menelaus, these things might well make a woman fear. Your men with violence have
driven me from my room, have laid their hands upon me. Of course I know -- almost I
know -- you hate me, but yet I ask you, what is your decision, yours and the Greeks?
Am I to live or not?
(She sways, holding her head)
Am I allowed to speak against this charge? To show you if I die that I shall die most
wronged and innocent?
(Passes a hand over her mouth)
And perhaps, no matter if you think I speak the truth of not, you will not talk to me, since you believe I am your enemy. Still, I will try to answer what I think you would say it you spoke your mind, and my wrongs shall be heard as well as yours. First: who began these evils? She, Hecuba, the day when she gave birth to Paris. Who next was guilty? The old king who decreed the child should live, and ruined Troy and me -- Paris, the hateful, the firebrand.
(Beat)
But, to the point. Is that what you are thinking? Why did I go? Steal from your house in secret? That man, Paris, or any name you like to call him, his mother’s curse. Oh, when he came to me a mighty goddess walked beside him. And you, poor fool, you spread
your sails for Crete, left Sparta, left him in your house.
(Beat)
Ah, well, not you, but my own self I ask, what was there in my heart that I went with him, a strange man, and forgot my home and country? Not I, but Aphrodite.
(Falling to her knees)
When Paris died and went down to the grave, the Trojans then no longer wanted me,
but the man who next took me -- and by force -- would never let my go.
(Rubbing her temples with her fingers)
I was forced by violence! I lived a life that had no joy, no triumph, in bitterness I lived a slave.
(Crying out)
No! No! Upon my knees, see, I am praying to you. It was the gods, not me! Oh, do not
kill me! Forgive!
(Buries her head in her hands, begins to swoon)









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-64


LILITH
(Changing her demeanor)
My Queen?
(Steadies her by the shoulders, helping her up)
Helen?

HELEN
(Coming round)
Am I Helen? Admired and blamed, newly returned to my homeland, does my husband
even now celebrate his glad return with his bravest men?

LILITH
(Holding an old woman’s mask before her face)
Without disdain, oh beauteous Queen, assume the highest honoured estate, for renown of beauty passes all else. The hero’s name resounds in his path, lends pride to his step; yet bows the hardest, proudest of men, in the sovereign presence of beauty his will.

HELEN
(Turning to Lilith)
Enough, Phorkyas. I come, together with my lord, ship-borne, and now his city must I
seek, his harbinger. But what intent his heart has, that I may not guess. Is it as wife I come? And come I as a queen? Or am I here a victim of my prince’s pain, and of the grief and sorrow long suffered by the Greeks? I am conquered. Am I captive too? Immortal powers decreed for me a fame and fate ambiguous. For yet within the hollow of
the ship my lord looked seldom on me, nor one cheerful word would speak. Sat facing
me as one with mischief in his mind.

LILITH
May ever-growing, glorious wealth now fill with joy your eyes and your heart.

HELEN
But scarcely had we to disembark, there followed straight a mandate from my lord.
That when I had made survey of all, in due order, then take as needed such as he will
want who offers sacrifice, fulfilling sacred rites. And to have the altar prepared accordingly. Nor let him fail to find the sacrificial knife. This a dark omen, I feel.
(Beat)
But I await the will of the Gods.

LILITH
Shapes of things to come you cannot divine. Onward, oh Queen, you may go, strong of
heart.








THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-65


HELEN
Let come what may. I go to enter the royal house.

LILITH
Wed to Menelaus by your father’s will, bold rover of the sea and pillar of his homeland. But while he strove afar, for heritage of Crete, to you in loneliness came all too fair a guest.

HELEN
Spare the confusion In the sad distracted mind. Even here, the truth of what I am, I do not know.
(To herself)
Was I but a wraith? Was it a dream?
(To Lilith)
Go, make ready a sacrifice, following my lord’s command.

LILITH
All stands ready within the house. Let the victim be named.

HELEN
The king never revealed.

LILITH
What dread omission.

HELEN
You mean...

LILITH
Your doom.

HELEN
(Despairing)
Oh hopeless me.

LILITH
But be firmly resolved, and you may save yourself.

HELEN
(Grasping hope)
Know you means of help?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-66


LILITH
Have you patience then?

HELEN
Patience enough to live!

LILITH
On mountain slopes far north from Sparta, once desolate, now settles a hardy race,
and made their stronghold.

HELEN
Have they but one lord, or are they many brigands?

LILITH
No brigands, but one of them commands as lord.

HELEN
What sort of man?

LILITH
Nothing amiss. I like him well. He is well-favoured, and shows a discerning mind. We
call his race barbarians, yet none so cruel, I think, as the many heroes seen at Troy,
who joyed in slaughter. This man has greatness. I’d trust in him.

HELEN
Enough. Say your last words.

LILITH
The last word is yours. Let me but hear “yes”.

HELEN
(Turning away)
Must I fear that Menelaus, king and lord, in ruthless cruelty means my doom?

LILITH
Have you forgotten how he mangled shamefully fallen Paris, who won you, in your
loneliness, for his bed? Both ears and nose he cropped, with more mutilation, ghastly
to behold.

HELEN
All for love, and on my account.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-67


LILITH
On his account he now will do the like to you.
(Scornful)
Beauty is not for sharing. He who has mastered her would rather slay her, with a curse
on love that’s shared.
(Raises an arm behind herself, to which is heard trumpets)
Hark, the sound of horns, do you hear? Do you not see the glint of arms?

HELEN
My mind is ready with the step that I shall dare. I will go yonder with you. Lead on.

[13] (Lilith takes Helen’s hand. The lights fluctuate, returning to what they were before. Lilith leads Helen to Faustus).

LILITH
My Queen, this is the man I spoke of, my lord Faustus.
(To Faustus)
My lord, Helen, Queen of Sparta.

HELEN
Some speech, sir, would I have with you.
(Leads him to the chair)
But come sit at my side.
(She sits in the chair)
The empty place invites your presence.
(She indicates the floor beside her, where Faustus kneels)
Let me tell you of myself, so you will know to whom you offer sanctuary. My fatherland
is called Sparta, and my father was Tyndareus, unless the tale be true that Zeus in the likeness of a swan flew to Leda, my mother, as if fleeing a pursuing eagle, and so won the act of love by treachery. It may be so.
(Smiles)
They called me Helen. When the time came, I was wed to Menelaus, King of Sparta.
(Beat)
Let me tell you all the truth of what has happened to me.
(Sighs)
Aphrodite, promising my loveliness to the arms of Paris, as prize for his loyalty. Pans left the Idaean herds for me to Sparta came, caused war for Greek glory and for Trojan grief, thus draining our mother earth of a multitude of human kind. So Troy fought for me against the spears of Greece. My ill-adventured lord assembled an armament to track me down the trail of my abduction, and marched to Troy. And many a life, beside the waters of Scamander, perished for me. And I am cursed by all to have betrayed my
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-68

HELEN (CONT’D)
lord and for the Hellenes lit the flame of a great war.
(Lost in the thought)
Why do I cling to life? With the cry of a dirge for the depth of my sorrows, make sad
sweet music of my lamentation. What singing spirit supplicate in tears? Ah me.
(Faustus begins to say something, but Helen raises a hand, stopping him)
The wrecked city of Ilium is given up to the all consuming flame, all through me and the deaths I caused, all for my name of affliction. So Leda has taken her life within the strangling noose, for the thought of shame in those sorrows that have been mine.

LILITH
Such sorrowful destiny ordained for thee, a life better unlived given to thee, yes given, when Zeus blazed in the bright air, in the snowf lash of the swan’s wing to beget thou upon thy mother. What knowest thou not of woe? From what ills art thou free? In death thy mother hides her pain, thy twin brothers, beloved children of Zeus, are blessed in fortune no longer. Thine homeland have thine eyes forsaken. Thou can come no more to bless the halls of thy father, bless the brazen house of Athena. Sorrows are thine, I know it well. But it were best to bear thine life’s constraints as lightly as thou may.

HELEN
(Despairing)
What is this destiny on which I am fastened? Was I born a monster among mankind? It
in some one respect the gods afflict us, it is not easy, yet we grieve with patience. But grief on grief is multiplied in me.

(Faustus looks to Lilith, who signals him to speak).

FAUSTUS
My lady...
(At a loss for words)

HELEN
(Looking at him)
Dead is my mother, I her murderer. That is unjust, yet such injustice I must endure. My daughter, pride of the household and mine own pride, grows grey unwed. And the
sons of Zeus, or so men call them, the Dioscuri, no longer live. So all my luck is turned to regret and for all purposes I am dead, yet live in fact. Such Is the depth of my unhappiness, that while for other women beauty means their happiness it is my very beauty that has ruined me.

LILITH
Thou leanest more to believe the worst and not the best.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-69


HELEN
Yes, I am frightened, and so led by fright to fear.

FAUSTUS
(Taking a cue from Lilith)
First, on my knees, most noble lady, may my true allegiance please you. Give me
leave to kiss the hand that bids me come to you.
(She lets him kiss her hand)
Invest me within your realm, that knows no bounds, and so win to your side a servant,
guard, and worshiper in one.

HELEN
Your words well please my ear.

FAUSTUS
If in mere speech I charm your ear, then surely action will satisfy the inmost sense.

HELEN
For words so lovely, how may I reward?

FAUSTUS
Soon said, it must come welling from the heart. And, overflowing heart’s bliss without
restraint, we lift our eyes and ask...

HELEN
Who shares the joy?

FAUSTUS
Turning our minds from past or future, for only in the present...

HELEN
Bliss we find.

FAUSTUS
So we understand. Who sets the seal, confirms the gain?

HELEN
My hand.

FAUSTUS
(Kissing her hand)
CONTINUED:









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-70


FAUSTUS (CONT’D)
I tremble, scarcely breathe, my words have fled. Space, time, all gone. I live as in a
dream.

HELEN
I live anew. In you interwoven, to the unknown.

FAUSTUS
Do not brood. Being is duty, were it a moment’s space.

(Helen pulls him up into her arms. They passionately, continues through
following, moving to the bench: lights down low. Spot up, Klinge steps into
it).

KLINGE
Letter from Joachim Camerarius, presently reforming the University at Tubingen, to
Daniel Stibar. The 13th of August, 1536.
(Reads)
“I owe to your friend Faustus the pleasure of discussing these affairs with you. I wish he had taught you something of this sort rather than putted you up with the wind of silly superstition or held you in suspense with I know not what juggler’s tricks. But what does he tell us, pray? For I know that you have questioned him diligently about all things. Is the emperor victorious? That is the way you should go about it?”

[14] (Spot down, Klinge exits. Lights up. Faustus and Helen repose on the bench,
entangled in each other's limbs).

HELEN
For the bliss of human feeling, love has joined two together. Then, for divine delight, love creates three.

FAUSTUS
I am yours and you are mine. Each in each fulfilled, united, love shall forever shine.
(Rising and looking around)
And where is our son, Justus?

HELEN
Reading the future.

FAUSTUS
And what does he see?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-71


HELEN
(Gravely)
You really don’t wish to know.

FAUSTUS
(Startled)
What?
(Trying to regain his composure)
What do you mean?

HELEN
(Sad)
He says your future is all used up.

(Faustus looks despondent. Helen rises, and crosses the room).

HELEN
(Turning to look at Faustus)
An ancient word is now fulfilled in me. That happiness and beauty cannot be one for
long. The bond of life is wrenched apart, like that of love. Mourning them both, with
aching heart I say farewell, and cast myself this last sad time into your embrace.
(Turning away)
Hecate, I come, take now the child and me.

(Helen exits. Faustus reaches for her, but falls to the floor. Lights slowly
[15] shift as he rises and crosses to the desk and sits deep in thought).

FAUSTUS
The time is at hand.

(Enter Meph.).

MEPH.
My Faustus, be not faint of heart. Thou dost indeed lose thy body, but thy time of judgment is yet far distant. Why surely thou must die -- even shouldst thou live for many hundreds of years. After all, thou knowest not yet what it be that awaiteth thee. Take courage, and despair not so utterly.

[16] (Meph. exits. Enter Wagner, who crosses to Faustus, looking concerned).

WAGNER
(Touching his shoulder)
What’s wrong, Doctor?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-72


FAUSTUS
Ah, my sweet chamber-fellow, had I remained true to you, then I might still live. But
now I die eternally. Look, he comes, he comes!

WAGNER
What do you mean, Faustus? Are you sick? Shall I fetch a physician?

FAUSTUS
A surfeit of deadly sin has damned both body and soul.

WAGNER
Yet, look to heaven. Remember God’s infinite mercies.

FAUSTUS
But my offenses can never be pardoned. Hear me with patience, and fear not my
speeches. Though my heart swells to remember that I have been a student here these
thirty years, would I had never seen Wittenberg, never read a book!
(Wistfully)
What wonders I have done. All Germany can witness. The world even.
(Downcast)
But I have lost all. My country, the world, and Heaven itself. For I am bound for hell, to remain forever.

WAGNER
(Pleading)
Call on God.

FAUSTUS
(Mirthless laugh)
On God, whom I abjured? On God, whom I blasphemed? I would weep, but the Devil
draws in my tears. I would lift up my hands, but see, they hold them back.

WAGNER
Who Faustus?

FAUSTUS
Lucifer and Mephostophiles. I gave them my soul for my cunning.

WAGNER
(Not surprised)
Yes, I feared as much.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/4-73


FAUSTUS
God forbade it, but I have done it. For vain pleasure these past twenty-four years I have lost eternal joy. I wrote a bill and signed with mine own blood. As part of this knowledge I gained, I became aware of the hour of my death.

WAGNER
(Admonishing)
Why did you not confide in me before? I would have done anything to help you.

FAUSTUS
I often thought to have done so, but I feared for your safety.

WAGNER
What can I do for you?

FAUSTUS
Nothing. Think of yourself, and depart.

WAGNER
I will stay. I will pray for you.

FAUSTUS
Yes, pray for me.
(Faustus rises and exits. Wagner watches him).





Scene 5 [17]: (An inn. Enter Wagner and Klinge).

WAGNER
I think my master believes he is to die soon, for he has given me all his goods: and yet, I think, if that death were so near, he would not dine and carouse and drink among the students, as even now he does, who are at supper with such cheer as I never beheld in all my life. See where they come! It seems the feast is ended.

(Wagner and Klinge sit amongst the audience. Then Faustus enters; he faces
the audience).









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-74


FAUSTUS
My dear, trusted, and very gracious lords: I have called you here for this good and sufficient cause. For many years now, you have known what manner of man I be, the arts
and the sorcery I have used. All these things come from none other than my communion with spirits. I gave myself up to one such spirit and contracted with him for a term of twenty-four years, setting my body and soul in jeopardy. Now are these twenty-four
years run out. I have only this night left. An hourglass stands before my eyes, and I
watch for it to finish.
(Begins to pace)
I know that the Horned One will have his due. As I have consigned my body and soul to him with my blood in return for certain other considerations, I have no doubt that he will this night fetch me. This is why, dear and well-beloved, gracious lords, I have summoned you here just before the end to take one last cup with me, not concealing from you the manner of my departure.
(Stops close to audience)
I entreat you now, my dear Brothers, to bring my cordial and brotherly greetings to my friends and to those who honour my memory, to bear no ill will toward me but, if ever I have offended you, to forgive me in your hearts.
(Crosses)
As regards my Historia and what I have wrought in those twenty-four years, all these things have been written down for you. Finally, my last request is that you go to bed and let nothing trouble you, but sleep on and take your rest even if a crashing and tumult be heard in this house. Be not afraid. No injury shall befall you. Arise not out of your beds. Should you find my corpse, convey it into the earth. Now I entreat you: take yourselves to bed. A good night to you. And to me, an unknown, mysterious, and frightful one.

KLINGE
(Standing)
Accursed Faustus, how have you imperiled yourself! Why you remained so long silent,
revealing none of these things to us? Why, we should have brought learned Theologi
who would have torn you out of the Devil’s nets and saved you. But now it is too late
and surely injurious to body and soul.

FAUSTUS
Such was not permitted me. Often was I of a mind to seek counsel of godfearing men.
Indeed, once you did advise me to follow your teachings, leave my sorcery and be
converted. Then came the spirit and turned my head again. I pray you, fare you well.

[18] (He turns away. Wagner and Klinge exit. Lights shift. Faustus paces about).

INNER VOICE OF FAUSTUS
Ah, Faustus, now have you but one more hour to live. And then you must be eternally
damned.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-75


FAUSTUS
(Trepidation)
Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven, that time may cease, and the hour
never pass.

VOICE
The stars still move, time runs, the clock will strike, and the devil will come.

(Faustus sits, buries his head in his hands. Beat. A monk, whose hood covers
his head enters).

FAUSTUS
(Looking up)
What? Who are you? Dr. Klinge?
(Turning away)
Do not try to console me, for surely as I sit here, I must die at my appointed time.

CORNELIUS
(Lowering the hood, revealing a ghostly visage)
Faustus, what have you done?

(Faustus jumps to his feet and stares at Cornelius).

FAUSTUS
Cornelius!
(Beat)
What...how...
(Beat. Cornelius just smiles at him)
I believed you to be dead these past three years. How is it you stand before me?

CORNELIUS
I have come from the next world, to see you in your last hour.

FAUSTUS
I have so many questions.

CORNELIUS
Had you kept on the way, Faustus, you would not now quake with fear.

FAUSTUS
What have I done? I’ve given my immortal soul up to the Infernal Ones.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-76


CORNELIUS
(Amused)
Do you still hold to your fairy-tales?

FAUSTUS
As Death approaches, I become more and more uncertain. Fear takes hold of me.

CORNELIUS
The body is merely a vehicle for the spirit to move about in. It has no more importance than that.

FAUSTUS
Yes, but what’s to become of my spirit?

CORNELIUS
I cannot answer that for you. You will have to wait and see.

FAUSTUS
I need more certainty than that.

CORNELIUS
You have dealt with energies which have their own agenda. There are consequences
to be paid.

FAUSTUS
Must I remain in hell forever? What will become of me being in hell forever?

CORNELIUS
You must fight against the spirits with all of your will. You must repel them.

FAUSTUS
But how?! How?!
(Covers his face with hands)
They are too strong.

CORNELIUS
(Withdrawing)
Only if you acquiesce.

(Cornelius exits. Faustus raises his head, sees Cornelius is gone. Lilith
sneaks in).










THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-77


FAUSTUS
You?! What do you want here? Where is Mephostophiles?

LILITH
(Giggling)
I came to see how foolishly thou conducts thyself at the last.

FAUSTUS
(Annoyed)
Torment me if you will, but you cannot resolve the doubts and questions of mankind.
Nor can Mephostophiles, nor your whole hellish rabble. Never did they penetrate more
insidiously into my heart than in this hour when I survey my past life. What is human life but a web of pain, vice, torment, hypocrisy, contradictions and squint-eyed virtue? What is freedom, choice, will, and the famous power to distinguish between good and evil, if passions outroar weak reason, like the tumultuous sea drowning the voice of the pilot whose ship is being driven against the rocks? And what is the cause, what is the reason of evil? The will of God? I hate the world, humanity and myself more bitterly than ever before.

(Lilith laughs, begins to dance about, as Meph. quietly enters, unseen).

FAUSTUS
(Sadness)
Why was I given the longing for happiness, since I was born to suffer? Why the yearning for light, since I was born for darkness? Why the thirst for freedom, since I was born a slave? Why the desire to fly, since I was made a worm?

LILITH
Faustus, I am a spirit created of flaming light and I have seen colossal worlds come
forth from the grains in the heavens. You are made of that same dust and are but of
yesterday. Am I to flatter you?

FAUSTUS
I wished to know the secrets of the universe.

LILITH
(Lounging on the floor)
You wished to hear the speech of the spirits. You heard it and sank down overcome by
the sound.

FAUSTUS
I did not understand.









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-78


(Faustus turns and sees Meph.)

FAUSTUS
What have you done to me?

MEPH.
Thou pushed thyself into courts and palaces, whence humanity is mocked, misused
and trampled underfoot, whilst the means of sustenance robbed from the poor are
shamefully wasted. The rulers of thy world, the tyrants and their executioners, priests who use religion as an instrument of oppression. All these thee hast witnessed. But not those who groan under the heavy yoke, who patiently bear the burden of existence and console themselves with hopes of a happier future. Proudly thou passed by the hovels of the poor and humble, who do not even know the names of thine sophisticated vices, who earn their bread with the sweat of their brow, share it faithfully with family and are happy in their last hours to have finished their labours at last. Without priests and philosophers, Faustus, there would be no hell.

FAUSTUS
(Frustration)
Eternal riddles, grim and dreadful vipers, forever self-begetting, self-consumed, you
waste my heart by winding and uncoiling in circles intertwined and ever new. I cannot
banish you, I cannot crush you. My labouring soul knows no respite from you. Ah, woe
to him who must accept your challenge! The thinker’s brow with deep-etched lines is
furrowed, and doubt is all the prize he’ll wrest from you.
(Assertive, rising to a fever pitch)
No! That fell snake-bite doubt shall now no longer gnaw slowly on at my grief-sickened
heart, no longer envenom the burning wound. I will be whole in the full light of truth! Distant the goal as stars, yet I’ll assault it, since vainly striving I can never attain...
(Raising his arms and face)
Spirits surrounding me, obey my will, the firm and rock-like will that summons you!

MEPH.
(Angered)
Thou son of earth who boldly spurnest us, what is thy pursuit?!

FAUSTUS
Knowledge I desire! Wisdom and truth! And FRRREEEEDOMMM!!!

LILITH
(Almost sympathetic)
Thy lofty words transcend the thoughts of mortals. Yet, didst thou conjure the spirit
world in sober earnest?









THE DAMNABLE DOCTOR FAUSTUS
II/5-79


FAUSTUS
(To both)
I turn away from you. I follow my will.

MEPH.
(Assertive)
Thou swore to us the price we demanded! And we gave to thee all that thou asked!
(Boiling anger)
I mock at thee, thou gimcrack bauble, and mock the greedy wishes of thy heart. I mock
at thee, rash fool whom I despise, and render thee the price which I agreed! Of reality thou’lt ne’er unveil. Thou thinkest only with the help of words, seest nature only with the senses’ aid, canst grasp her only with the laws of mind. Hadst thou a hundred, nay a thousand eyes, thou still wouldst see but shadows thrown by thee, and never penetrate beyond that veil.

(Faustus just looks at them a moment).

FAUSTUS
(Quietly)
Begone, serpent, begone.
(Exploding)
BEGONE!!!

(A clock strikes twelve. Meph. and Lilith exit. Faustus just watches them. He then looks around him with trepidation. F.O. Pause. Then a loud banging (or such) begins, rising to a deafening noise. Confused voices are heard,
praying, swearing, guestioning. The noise subsides).

[19] (Lights up. Wagner enters, looks about for Faustus, finding only blood and viscera. In the mirror is the image of Faustus, being pulled back by Lilith. F.O.).